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14 August 2015
 
Seminar:
The Centre for Public, International and Comparative Law and UQ Solomon Island Partnership
 
Topic:
Trials and Tribulations: Law and the Courts in the Solomon Islands
 
Legal systems of former colonies are often burdened with a legacy of transplanted laws, developed for use in a foreign country. Today, Solomon Islands is struggling with a plural legal system and seeking to balance the demands of law from different sources, designed to operate in fundamentally different contexts. This seminar will examine the legal systems of Solomon Islands and the tensions between the different laws in force. It will discuss the court system and, more specifically, how the system has dealt with the aftermath of the tensions 2000-10. It will also touch on issues within the legal profession.
 
Presenters:
Honourable Glen Norman Williams, AO, Q.C. LL.D.(Honoris causa), BA, LLB, retired judge of the Supreme Court and the Court of Appeal of Queensland, and of the Court of Appeal Solomon Islands, Adjunct Professor TC Beirne School of Law.
Professor Jennifer Corrin, Director, Centre for Public, International and Comparative Law, TC Beirne School of Law, ARC Future Fellow, former Solomon Islands legal practitioner.
 
Venue:
Sir Samuel Griffith Room, 1-W341, Forgan Smith Building (1) UQ St Lucia Campus
 
Time:
12:00-1:00pm
 

 
22 June 2015
 
Seminar:
The Centre for Public, International and Comparative Law and UQ Solomon Island Partnership
 
Topic:
Growing a new Solomon Islands: Vision, Promise and Potential for Engagement
 
In this tok stori, Kabini Sanga will share the vision of the FFM for growing a new EEE  Solomon Islands, and invite attendees to explore potential opportunity spaces for understanding and (university) engagement.
 
Presenter:
Kabini Sanga is a Solomon Islands educator and mentor. He is a clan leader of the Gwailao of East Mala’ita. A leader-by-choice, he sews seeds of thought, encourages and advocates for the dignity of people groups; and champions Leadership Pacific vision of growing a new generation of Pacific leaders. The first Solomon Islander educator to obtain a PhD, Kabini was a twice Canadian Commonwealth Scholar, a former director of SICHE (now SINU), a former secondary school principal and a former director of the Institute of Education of the University of the South Pacific. Kabini offers advice to Pacific leaders on issues of ethics and leadership; and to governments and international agencies on issues of people development. Kabini works in Wellington as an Associate Professor of Education at Victoria University of Wellington; and is a member of the governing council of the University of the South Pacific.
 
Venue:
Sir Samuel Griffith Room, 1-W341, Forgan Smith Building (1) UQ St Lucia Campus
 
Time:
12:00noon
 
Contact:
Law Events, ph: +7 3365 2523, email: events@law.uq.edu.au
 

 
4 June 2015
 
Solomon Islands Initiative Meeting
 
Sir Samuel Griffith Room, Forgan Smith Building (1)
 
A meeting of the UQ Solomon Islands Partnership was held on 4 June 2015.  The meeting attracted a large number of UQ staff and postgraduate students with interests in Solomon Islands.  During 2014 and 2015 the Solomon Islands Partnership has prepared a White Paper on future Solomon Islands Research Initiatives and held discussions on the best way to proceed.  The meeting began with an outline of the MOUs between UQ and the Solomon Islands Government and now with the Solomon Islands National University.  Presentations were made by UQ participants and Tim Skews from CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere EPOG project.  Their PowerPoint presentations are listed below. We have also included a copy of the draft White Paper, and report by Ian Tibbetts on a 2015 consultation at SINU, and a paper by Gordon Nanau of the history of research at SICHE and SINU.
 
5 minute slide presentations on research interests
Solomon Islands Initiative Meeting composite presentation
 
4 June 2015 - Solomon Islands Initiative Seminar Participants
4 June 2015: Solomon Island Initiative Seminar Participants
 

 
15 May 2015
 
Seminar:
The Centre for Public, International and Comparative Law and UQ Solomon Island Partnership
 
Topic:
Honiara: Arrival City and Pacific Hybrid Living Space
 
This seminar analyses Honiara as a Pacific arrival city and hybrid living space that retains many village-like qualities. In Doug Saunders’ ‘arrival city’ model, new arrivals are sustained by established networks which enable them eventually to integrate into urban life, along with considerable circulation with a constant flow from and to the provinces. However, the relatively small size of Honiara and Solomon Islands, plus the resilience of aspects of village culture, bring into question some theoretical models based on much larger, more anonymous developing world cities.
 
Honiara’s urban districts combine land with permanent and long-tenure titles, temporary tenure settlements, and squatter areas with no tenured status. Settlement and squatter areas are more dominant than ‘suburbs’, exist alongside and are called ‘villages’ by their inhabitants. Wantokism, kastom and linguistic diversity permeate these urban villages and extended family networks. The seminar draws on participant observation since the 1970s, newspapers, surveys, urban statistics and secondary sources to understand how Honiara has changed over recent decades.
 
Many Solomon Islands issues from the ‘Tension’ years (1998–2003) and the decade beyond relate to Honiara. Malaitan migration has predominantly been to the Guadalcanal Plains and to Honiara, the nation’s main concentration of urbanisation and resultant social pressure is centred there. Honiara’s population— roughly 16 percent of the nation of 500,000—means that understanding its history and social dynamics is crucial to all future development in the nation’s nine provinces and almost 1,000 islands. The conclusion argues that authorities must come to terms with arrivals, squatters and settlements/villages and incorporate them into planning, or face future urban turmoil.
 
Presenter:
Professor Clive Moore, CSI, FAHA is McCaughey Professor of Pacific and Australian History in the School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry at The University of Queensland.
 
Venue:
Sir Samuel Griffith Room, 1-W341, Forgan Smith Building (1) UQ St Lucia Campus
 
Time:
12:00noon
 
Contact:
Law Events, ph: +7 3365 2523, email: events@law.uq.edu.au
 

 
19 September 2014
 
Courting Blakness
Panel Session on Blackbirding
 
Convenor:
Professor Jennifer Corrin, Director, Centre for Public, International and Comparative Law Professor, T.C. Beirne School of Law, The University of Queensland. Professor Corrin convened the session on behalf of the Centre for Public, International and Comparative Law and UQ Solomon Island Partnership.
 
Chairperson:
Mr Sean Dorney was Chair of the Panel.
 
First Speaker:
UQ’s McCaughey Professor of Pacific and Australian History Clive Moore spoke about the history surrounding Blackbirding.
 
Second Speaker:
Legal Issues Professor Reid Mortensen from the University of Southern Queensland spoke about the use of the language of slavery in two prosecutions for blackbirding in Australian courts in the 1860s – those relating to the voyages of the Daphne and the Jason. While at times the language of slavery was used by colonial judges, until its use was abandoned in political circles it also impeded a more effective regulation of the indentured labour trade.
 
Third Speaker:
Mr Paul Malai Mae, a doctoral student in the TC Beirne School of Law, from Solomon Islands, spoke about community experiences relating to Blackbirding.
 
Date: 19th September 2014
Time: 12:00 - 1:30pm
Venue: Sir Samuel Griffith Room, W341, Level 3
             Forgan Smith Building (1)
             The University of Queensland, St Lucia
 

 
4 October 2013
 
Seminar:
The Centre for Public, International and Comparative Law and UQ Solomon Island Partnership
 
Topic:
Mining in Solomon Islands: balancing economic, environmental and social factors
 
With the talk of mining being the future of the Solomon Islands economy it is timely to consider-is the nation prepared for a large scale mining industry? The environmental, economic and social track record of other natural resource extraction activities in the country has been poor. However the scale of investment in mining projects provides the potential for significant economic development and for management and mitigation of environmental impacts. To date, examples within the region provide an indication of the potential for environmental damage and social impact that can result from poorly managed and regulated mining developments. Drawing on these lessons can assist the Solomon Islands to provide a strong foundation for the development of a mineral industry. However access to this information by the remote rural communities likely to be impacted by mineral developments is difficult. Simon recently produced a documentary targeted at these rural communities that captures stories and lessons from communities, companies and governments engaged with mining activities in Melanesia. 
 
Presenter:
Dr Simon Albert, Research Fellow, UQ School of Civil Engineering.
 
Venue:
Sir Samuel Griffith Room, 1-W341, Forgan Smith Building
 
Time:
12.00 - 1.00pm
 
Contact:
Beth Williams, ph: (334) 69350, email: b.williams@law.uq.edu.au
 

 
9 August 2013
 
Seminar:
The Centre for Public, International & Comparative Law and UQ Solomon Islands Partnership 
 
Topic:
Working with Santa Isabel chiefs - supporting tradition for stability in a changing world
 
Presenter:
Dr Graham Baines, Honorary Research Fellow, Anthropology
 
Venue:
Sir Samuel Griffith Room W341, Level 3, Forgan Smith Building (1), St Lucia
 
Time:
12:00 - 1:00pm 
 
Contact:
Beth Williams, Events and External Relations Officer, TC Beirne School of Law, Phone: 3346 9350, Email: events@law.uq.edu.au
 

 
11 April 2013
 
Seminar:
 
Topic:
A history of use and abuse of coconut based on Solomon Islands experience
 
Presenter:
Mr Mike Foale, Honorary Fellow, UQ Solomon Islands Partnership
 
Venue:
Sir Samuel Griffith Room, 1-W341, Forgan Smith Building (1) UQ St Lucia Campus
 
Time:
Thursday 11 April, 12:00 - 1:00pm
 
Contact:
Ms Beth Williams, External Relations and Events Officer, TC Beirne School of Law
 

 
10 May 2012
 
Seminar:
Centre for Heritage Innovation Research and UQ Solomon Islands Partnership
 
Topic:
Legal Pluralism in the Pacific: Solomon Island’s World War II Heritage
 
Presenter:
Dr Craig Forrest - Associate Professor, TC Beirne School of Law
 
Venue:
The Board Room, UQ Art Museum, St Lucia Campus
 
Time:
Thu, 10 May 2012: 4:00 - 5:30pm
 
Contact:
Prof. Jennifer Corrin, Co-Convenor, UQSIP or Dr Graeme Were, Convenor of Museum Studies, email: j.corrin@law.uq.edu.au or g.were@uq.edu.au
 
This is a joint seminar proudly presented by the Centre for Heritage Innovation Researc Solomon Islands, like most Pacific island nations, has a legally pluralistic regime. That is, the constitutionally recognised customary law operates in parallel with that inherited from its colonial past and promulgated under a western style constitutional system. This raises significant legal difficulties, including in the way cultural heritage is protected and managed. This issue arose in relation to the legislation designed to regulate the recovery and export of World War II relics, and was the subject of a rare High Court decision in 2010. The Court had to undertake a review of a decision by the Minister of Culture and Tourism to cancel a licence issued pursuant to the Protection of Wrecks and War Relics Act of 1980. The licence allowed the licensee to recover and export the remains of a number of Japanese Zero fighter aircraft from Solomon Islands. While a relatively innocuous case, it raised a number of issues that addressed the rights of different stakeholders to this material, and indeed, raised a foundational question as to whether these relics may be considered cultural heritage, and if so, just whose heritage it was.
 
A consideration of this case and the legislation that applies to this heritage serves to illustrate the difficulties that arise within pluralistic legal structures, which is exacerbated when the aims of the legislation is either unclear because it is difficult to discern the basis upon which this heritage is protected by the legislation, and therefore subject to different legal regimes in the pluralistic legal framework. These uncertainties have particular repercussions for the many open air ‘museums’ of World War II relics created in various parts of Solomon islands.
 

 
10 November 2010
 
EMSAH Seminar:
Critical Approaches to Museums and Heritage, and UQ Solomon Islands Partnership
 
Presenter:
 
Topic:
Waku in Solomon Islands: Asian Investment and Diplomacy
 
Venue:
Sir Samuel Griffith Room, 1-W341, Forgan Smith Building (1)
 
Time:
Friday 19 November 2010: 12:00 - 1:00pm
 
After the 2006 Solomon Islands National Election, an angry crowd attacked the Parliament, burnt down Chinatown and caused the resignation of the newly-elected Prime Minister Snyder Rini. The reason was Rini’s supposed close relationship with corrupt Asian investors who were accused of manipulating the nation’s economy and politics. Allegations about Asian business did not emerge as a signifi cant factor in the 2010 National Election, which led to the peaceful election of Danny Philip as Prime Minister, although the level of Asian investment and exploitation has remained the same. Philip, who as Minister of Foreign Affairs in 2000, flirted with mainland China at the expense of the long-standing diplomatic recognition of Taiwan, has signaled a ‘Look North’ policy, and also constitutional changes to allow customary landowners to develop their resources directly, which would allow easy exploitation by foreign companies. The paper examines the history of Asian involvement in the economy of the Solomon Islands and the diplomatic relationship with the Republic of Taiwan.
 
Clive Moore is Professor of Pacific and Australian History, and Head of the School of History, Philosophy, Religion and Classics, at The University of Queensland. His major and rather eclectic publications have been on Australia’s Pacific Island immigrants, the Pacific labour reserve, Australian federation, masculinity, gay Queensland, New Guinea, and the Solomon Islands. His most recent books are the monographs Sunshine and Rainbows: The Development of Gayand Lesbian Culture in Queensland (2001), New Guinea: Crossing Boundaries and History (2003) and Happy Isles inCrisis: The Historical Causes for a Failing State in Solomon Islands, 1998–2004 (2004), The Forgan Smith: History of a Building and its People at The University of Queensland (2010), and his edited work, Tell It As It Is: Autobiography of Rt. Hon. Sir Peter Kenilorea, KBE, PC, Solomon Islands’ fi rst Prime Minister (2008). He was the inaugural President of the Australian Association for the Advancement of Pacific Studies (2006-2010) and was co-author in 2009 of A National Strategy for the Study of the Pacific.
 
All welcome, no RSVP required.
 
Presented in conjuction with The TC Beirne School of Law’s, Centre for Public, International and Comparative Law (CPICL) in association with the UQ Solomon Islands Partnership (UQSIP).
 

 
27 October 2010
 
Seminar:
Societal Strengths for Conflict Prevention and Peacebuilding in Solomon Islands
 
Topic:
Prospects for Localising the Responsibility to Protect
 
Presenters:
Volker Boege and Morgan Brigg
 
Venue:
Sir Llew Edwards Building (Bldg #14), Room 216
 
Time:
Wednesday 27 October, 2:00pm
 
Significant popular attention focuses upon the more interventionist elements of the Responsibility to Protect and, accordingly, on the role of international actors. This occurs despite the fact that core capacities for conflict prevention, community safety and the aversion of mass atrocities reside in local non-state actors and institutions. To explore the possibility of enhancing the capacity to protect by drawing upon local and societal strengths, this presentation reports upon research about prospects for enhanced cooperation between international, state, and local non-state justice and order actors in Solomon Islands. We provide an overview of capacity to protect in Solomon Islands before reporting our recent research findings about community views on the capacity, effectiveness and legitimacy of key justice and order actors in the local context. This allows us to analyse complementarity, incompatibility, and substitutability among international, state and local non-state actors. We will also report upon a draft framework, to be further developed in Solomon Islands later this year, which aims to provide guidance to international and state actors to enable them to better support and work with local non-state providers of order and security.
 
Presented in conjunction with the UQ Solomon Islands Partnership.
 

 
22 April 2010
 
Presenter:
Professor Clive Moore
 
Venue:
University of Queensland Art Museum, St Lucia Campus, UQ, Building 1
 
Time:
5:30 - 6:30pm
 
During 2007 and 2008, Professor Clive Moore edited the autobiography of Sir Peter Kenilorea, the Solomon Islands’ first Prime Minister and now Speaker of the National Parliament, produced in time for the thirtieth anniversary of Independence on 7 July 2008. Editing the autobiography of a Pacific statesman was an unusual exercise, which involves what is now called Life Writing, but also includes social, political and, in this case, religious history.  The project was generously sponsored by the Government of Taiwan, which meant that an extra level of diplomacy was involved.  In the process, Professor Moore got to know Sir Peter and his family, and was able to use his own thirty-five year knowledge of Solomon Islands in the process. The lecture will endeavour to grapple with the complex process of editing and, through it, understanding something of the Solomon Islands, forty years of the political process, and also the life of the father of the nation.
 
Clive Moore is Professor of Pacific and Australian History, and Head of the School of History, Philosophy, Religion and Classics, at The University of Queensland.  His major and rather eclectic publications have been on Australia’s Pacific Island immigrants, the Pacific labour reserve, Australian federation, masculinity, gay Queensland, New Guinea, and the Solomon Islands.  His most recent books are the monographs New Guinea: Crossing Boundaries and History (2003) and Happy Isles in Crisis: The Historical Causes for a Failing State in Solomon Islands, 1998–2004 (2004), and his edited work, Tell It As It Is: Autobiography of Rt. Hon. Sir Peter Kenilorea, KBE, PC, Solomon Islands’ first Prime Minister (2008).  He is the inaugural President of the Australian Association for the Advancement of Pacific Studies. 
 
This lecture is presented in association with the UQ Solomon Islands Partnership.
 

 
19 March 2010
 
Seminar:
Decolonising the Solomon Islands: British Theory and the Melanesian Practice
 
Presenter:
Professor Clive Moore
 
Venue:
Sir Samuel Griffith Room (1-W341), Forgan Smith Building, St Lucia Campus
 
Time:
12:00 - 1:00pm
 
Until 1951 no Solomon Islander’s opinion was ever sought over policy development by the British Solomon Islands Protectorate government. In that year four Solomon Islanders were nominated for the Executive Council and various constitutional reforms were made between 1960 and 1978, slowly preparing the Protectorate for a transfer of power through a unitary state operating under the Westminster system.  British policy was guided by previous colonial experiences in Africa, Asia and the Pacific, and to a limited extent by local circumstances, particularly through Constitutional Review Committees. The independence constitution of 1978 was the product of local consultation, precedent from other British dependencies and the advice of constitutional experts. In the light of thirty years since independence and the turbulent ‘crisis years’ 1998–2003, could the British government have better prepared the nation for independence?
 
Clive Moore is Professor of Pacific and Australian History, and Head of the School of History, Philosophy, Religion and Classics, at The University of Queensland.  His major and rather eclectic publications have been on Australia’s Pacific Island immigrants, the Pacific labour reserve, Australian federation, masculinity, gay Queensland, New Guinea, and the Solomon Islands.  His most recent books are the monographs New Guinea: Crossing Boundaries and History (2003) and Happy Isles in Crisis: The Historical Causes for a Failing State in Solomon Islands, 1998–2004 (2004), and his edited work, Tell It As It Is: Autobiography of Rt. Hon. Sir Peter Kenilorea, KBE, PC, Solomon Islands’ first Prime Minister (2008).  He is the inaugural President of the Australian Association for the Advancement of Pacific Studies.
 
All welcome. No RSVP required. Please forward this invitation on to anyone who may be interested.
 

 
15 March 2010
 
Seminar:
Land Rights in Melanesia
 
Presenters:
Associate Professor Jennifer Corrin, Executive Director - Asia Pacific Law in the Centre for Public International and Comparative Law
Gary Lee, Co-Director AID/WATCH
Joel Simo, Land Desk, Vanuatu Cultural Centre
Steven Sukot, Campaigns Manager, Bismarck Ramu Group, Papua New Guinea
 
Venue:
Law School Common Room, Forgan Smith Building
 
Time:
12:00 - 1:30pm
 
Throughout Melanesia, customary land tenure is under pressure from international financial institutions and aid organisations that want to instigate land reforms as a means to accelerate economic growth in the region. However, local indigenous peoples have significant concerns about the transformation of ownership practices through registration and privatisation. Customary ownership remains central to the lives, identities and economic activity of Melanesian peoples and reforms threaten to alienate the land from traditional owners. The seminar will discuss the proposed reforms to land tenure in Melanesia, the possible impact on local people and alternative strategies to facilitate economic development.
 
Joel Simo is the Director of the Land Desk at the Vanuatu Cultural Centre in Port Vila, Vanuatu. Joel has published numerous works on Land in Vanuatu, including a Report of the National Review of the Customary Land Tribunal Program in Vanuatu and a co-authored report on Matrilineal Land Tenure in Vanuatu for the Pacific Islands Forum Secretariat. Joel has extensive experience leading grassroots community education and organising at a national level, and has played a key role in facilitating regional networks and collaborations on land.
 
Steven Sukot is the Campaigns Manager for the Bismarck Ramu Group, a local community development and conservation NGO based in Madang, Papua New Guinea. Protecting Melanesian customary land is a major focus of BRG’s campaigns at present. Steven has been instrumental in facilitating the formation of the Melanesian Indigenous Land Defence Alliance (MILDA). He has also acted as a spokesperson for Papua New Guinean NGOs on land issues at both a national and international level.
 
Jointly sponsored by Aid/Watch, the School of Political Science and International Studies, the Centre for Public International and Comparative Law and the Australian Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies.
 

 
26 February 2010
 
Seminar:
Frogs of the Solomon Islands: Implications for Rainforest Conservation
 
Presenter:
Patrick Pikacha
 
Venue:
Sir Samuel Griffith Room (1-W341), Forgan Smith Building, UQ, St Lucia campus
 
Time:
12:00 - 1:00pm
 
Solomon Islands is one of the most bio-diverse regions of the world. The land area has one of the highest densities of endemism amongst vertebrates on earth. Species are still being discovered especially in remote forests. And yet, relentless logging, other anthropogenic impacts, and natural climate phenomena are threatening the islands and the ecosystems that support this amazing diversity. Mr Patrick Pikacha’s study aims to determine the taxonomy, abundance and distribution of frogs in the Solomon Islands. The paucity of this knowledge is hampering current conservation efforts.
 
Mr Patrick Pikacha is coordinator of the program of Conservation International in Solomon Islands. He has conducted biodiversity research in the Solomon Islands, with a focus on frogs and small mammals and is co-author of the book 'Frogs of Solomon Islands'. He currently coordinates conservation efforts and works with communities on different islands in the Solomons, on achieving conservation outcomes by working through the local land tenure systems. His passion for the Melanesian environment led him to founding a local grassroots magazine called Melanesian Geo and website www.melanesiangeo.org This grassroots initiative has received support from both communities and institutions. (from IUBS BioEd 2009 Conference Session Speakers’ Bios).
 
All welcome. No RSVP required. Please forward this invitation on to anyone who may be interested. Further information about the UQ Solomon Islands Partnership can be found at http://hapi.uq.edu.au/solomon-islands-partnership.
 

 
23 February 2009
 
Update:
Documentary "Marovo-Lagoon of Life" screening a success!
 
On Tuesday 23rd Febrary, the UQ Solomon Islands Partnership co sponsored the screening event of the documentary "Marovo-Lagoon of Life". This film took the audience (31 people strong!) on a journey through nature, conservation, traditions and resource management in one of Melanesia’s treasures - Marovo Lagoon, Solomon Islands. It was created from a blend of the latest HD equipment, world class film making expertise, smallest of budgets, a floating editing room, patience and a lot of Melanesian people’s input and guidance. This film is an education and awareness tool developed from a UQ program in the Solomon Islands aimed at supporting community based resource management. A Pijin and Marovo language narration supports the powerful images (with English sub-titles). Wade Fairley (BBC-Planet Earth, South Pacific) was at UQ to present this film before returning to his thatched editing suite in the jungle.  
 
The University of Queensland Solomon Islands Partnership and the Centre for Public, International and Comparative Law, TC Beirne School of Law is proud to present a seminar on Inter-disciplinary Conservation Initiatives in Marovo Lagoon.
 

 
13 October 2009
 
Seminar:
South Pacific Courts: The Court of Appeal of Solomon Islands
 
On Tuesday October 13 between 4 and 5pm His Honour Mr Justice Williams (details below) will give a seminar for the South Pacific Comparative Law Masters class on South Pacific courts and in particular the work of the Court of Appeal of Solomon Islands. This session will be open to members of the UQSIP as part of our seminar series.
 
Presenter:
Hon. Glen Williams AO, Q.C.LL.D.(Honoris causa), B.A., LL.B., Adjunct Professor T.C.Beirne School of Law, Judge Court of Appeal Solomon Islands since 1993
 
Venue:
Room S603 in building 24
 
Time:
4:00 - 5:00pm
 

 
14 August 2009
 
Seminar:
Florence Young and the Queensland Kanaka Mission, 1886–1906: Beginnings of an Indigenous Pacific Church
 
Presenter:
Professor Clive Moore, School of History, Philosophy, Religion and Classics, the University of Queensland
 
Chair:
Dr Geoffrey Kenilorea, Faculty of Health Sciences, the University of Queensland
 
In the last Solomon Islands census in 1999 there were 69,651 members South Sea Evangelical Church. Today, adherents number around 85,000, eleven percent of the Christians in the nation. The SSEC grew out of the South Sea Evangelical Mission, which began in 1907 as an islands-based continuation of the Queensland Kanaka Mission that operated in Australia and Solomon Islands between 1886 and 1906. The SSEM remains primarily a Solomon Islands church, but also expanded to Papua New Guinea after the Second World War, changed its designation from Mission to Church in the 1964, and was finally localised in the 1980s. The QKM/SSEM/SSEC developed into the largest indigenous church in Solomon Islands. This paper examines the history of the QKM in Australia between 1886 and 1906, and on Malaita Island between 1894 and 1906. The Queensland operation is relatively well known, at least in outline. Knowledge of the spread of this Australian mission church into Solomon Islands is far more sketchy and will form the central theme of this discussion. The paper attempts to understand how the remarkable expansion of the QKM was accomplished, and the role of the founder Florence Young, particularly in the crucial years between 1900 and 1906.
 
Venue:
Sir Samuel Griffith Room (W341), Forgan Smith Building (St Lucia)
 
Time:
12:00pm - 1:00pm
 
Contact:
Further details of the project can be found at http://www.cms.uq.edu.au/marbot/Solomons/overview.htm.
 
All welcome, no RSVP required.
 

 
10 July 2009
 
Presenters:
Associate Professor Jennifer Corrin, Executive Director - Asia Pacific Law, Centre for Public, International and Comparative Law, TC Beirne School of Law
Dr Ian Tibbetts, Senior Lecturer, Centre for Marine Studies
 
Chair:
Professor Suri Ratnapala, Director, Centre for Public, International and Comparative Law, TC Beirne School of Law.
 
Venue:
Sir Samuel Griffith Room (W341), Forgan Smith Building, UQ, St Lucia campus
 
Time:
12:00 - 1:00pm
 
The Seminar will highlight marine and legal aspects of a conservation project in Marovo Lagoon, Solomon Islands. This is a three-year project by a UQ team, funded by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. The overall goal of this project is to provide an integrated approach to the environmental management of Marovo Lagoon that will support protection of the region’s high biodiversity and allow for sustainable use of the Lagoon’s resources to support the local communities. To achieve this the team is undertaking an inventory of marine ecosystems in the Lagoon and various aspects of its current ecosystem health, community justice initiatives, and an anthropological study of the Indigenous cultures to identify current approaches to environmental management and use of the lagoons resources.
 
Further details of the project can be found at http://www.cms.uq.edu.au/marbot/Solomons/overview.htm  or at research@law.uq.edu.au.
 
All welcome, no RSVP required. A light lunch will be provided.
 

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